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Pets

Our pets aren’t just companion animals. They’re treasured friends, and even beloved family members. While it’s never fun or pleasant to think about what will happen to them if the worst should happen to us, it’s very important to consider how we can ensure they are well cared for when and if we are no longer able to care for them ourselves. Thankfully, creating a solid plan through a pet trust can help give us peace of mind.

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DENVER (AP) — When Lisa Young evacuated her home as a fast-moving Colorado wildfire burned, it looked like firefighters were going to be able to stop what appeared then to just be a grass fire in a field behind her home. She just took her purse, turned off her slow cooker and television and made sure her two cats had enough food and water to drink, thinking she would be back home soon.

The new year is upon us.  It's time to take a look back on the past year and determine what we might want to change, do better or accomplish in 2022.  For pet parents, much of this reflection applies to the lives they share with their pets.

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The truth: You can absolutely teach an older dog new tricks, like how to shake hands, speak or roll over. Keeping the training sessions short and fun while using plenty of positive reinforcement like treats and praise can help make the training process easier.

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The truth: At one point in time, it was believed dogs could only see in black, white and shades of gray. This myth is still believed by many people today. Dogs have fewer color-sensitive cones in their eyes than humans do. However, it has been discovered that although it’s not in the same way as humans, dogs can in fact see color. They can see blue, green-ish yellow and yellow along with various shades of gray.

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