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A trial is set to start in Billings in a challenge to three new laws that the Montana Democratic Party and others argue were aimed at makging voting more difficult for Native Americans, young voters, the elderly and people with disabilities. District Court Judge Michael Moses will hear start hearing arguments Monday on challenges to laws that eliminated Election Day voter registration, changed voter ID requirements for college students and banned paid collection of voted ballots. Secretary of State Christi Jacobsen requested the bills as Republicans changed voting laws nationwide following the November 2020 election and false claims by former President Donald Trump and his supporters that the election was stolen.

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We’ve all seen commencement speakers give advice to graduates as they’re about to enter the workforce. In much the same way, financial experts are in the unique position to impart money advice to the younger generation. I asked personal finance authors, columnists and podcast hosts who have figured out a thing or two about money to share the nuggets of wisdom they wish they could tell their younger selves. Among their advice? Invest in the stock market early, save as much as you can, steer clear of credit card debt and don’t worry so much about having it all figured out.

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The children and teens who remain in eastern Ukraine are retreating into social media, video games and other digital technology to cope with the isolation and stress of Russia's war that rages on the nearby front line. Cities have largely emptied after hundreds of thousands have evacuated from the embattled Donetsk region. The youth who remain face loneliness and boredom as painful counterpoints to the fear and violence Moscow has unleashed on Ukraine. More than 6 million Ukrainians have fled. They are overwhelmingly women and children. Millions of others are internally displaced. Countless childhoods have been upended not only for those having to start a new life after seeking safety elsewhere. But also for the thousands who stayed behind.

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Facebook failed to detect election-related misinformation in ads ahead of Brazil's 2022 election, a new report from Global Witness has found. The group said the company's persisting pattern of not catching material that violates its policies is “alarming.” The advertisements contained false information about the country's upcoming election, such as promoting the wrong date for the vote and questioning the integrity of the election, including Brazil’s electronic voting system. It is the fourth such test of Facebook's moderation system that the human rights group has conducted over the past few months — and the fourth one Facebook has flubbed.

A private prison company has agreed to settle a federal lawsuit over a Tennessee inmate’s killing. The resolution comes after a magistrate judge last month received national attention for ordering the inmate’s attorney to delete fiery tweets about CoreCivic and stop publicly commenting about the company and the case. A CoreCivic spokesperson says the settlement terms are confidential. Plaintiff's attorney Daniel Horwitz says he remains unable to comment due to the gag order on the case surrounding Trousdale Turner Correctional Center. Horwitz is representing G. Marie Newby, the mother of Terry Childress. Court records show Childress died in February 2021 after his Trousdale cellmate assaulted him.

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Some of the rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, are trying to profit from their participation in the deadly insurrection while they face the legal consequences for their crimes. In some cases, rioters have used the attack as a platform for promoting their business endeavors, political aspirations or social media profiles. Many of those charged have used websites and crowdfunding platforms to raise money after their arrests. Efforts to capitalize on the riot haven’t gone over well with federal prosecutors or the judges who've sentenced more than 200 riot defendants so far. Prosecutors often cite the profit-chasing activities in seeking tougher punishments.

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Pennsylvania Senate candidate John Fetterman is acknowledging he is lucky to be alive as he officially returns to the campaign trail. He's been sidelined for more than 90 days after suffering a stroke that threatened the Democrat's life and political strength in one of the nation’s premier Senate contests. Fetterman spoke Friday for nearly 11 minutes, haltingly at times, as he addressed several hundred voters packed inside an Erie convention center. The 52-year-old lieutenant governor says: “Tonight for me, it’s about being grateful — just grateful. Three months ago my life could have ended.” Republican opponent Dr. Mehmet Oz has railed against Fetterman's prolonged absence throughout the summer.

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Officials say St. Charles Health System in Central Oregon accidentally overpaid thousands of employees a total of $2 million and is demanding employees pay that money back. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports employees were told Thursday of the total amounts allegedly owed. Scott Palmer of the Oregon Nurses Association said the amounts range from less than $100 to as much as $3,000. More than 2,300 employees apparently owe some money to St. Charles. The pay issues stem from a ransomware attack on Ultimate Kronos Group, a technology company that runs St. Charles’ payroll system. Scott Palmer of the Oregon Nurses Association said their members have received little evidence that the hospital system overpaid employees.

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Newspaper publisher Gannett Co. confirmed Friday that it’s laying off some of its newsroom staff as part of a cost-cutting effort to lower its expenses as its revenue crumbles amid a downturn in ad sales and customer subscriptions. The McLean, Virginia-based company declined to provide details about the number of people who were losing their jobs. Gannett, which owns USA Today and more than 200 other daily U.S. newspapers with print editions, ended last year with more than 16,000 employees worldwide, according to the company's annual report. The payroll included including more than 4,200 reporters, editors and photographers.

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A law enforcement official says a gunman who died in a shootout after trying to get inside the FBI’s Cincinnati office appeared to have posted calls on social media for FBI agents to be killed and for people to take up arms in the wake of the search at Donald Trump’s home. The official was not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. The gunman has been identified as 42-year-old Ricky Shiffer. He was killed on Thursday. The official said investigators are examining whether he had ties to far-right extremist groups such as the Proud Boys.

A judge has held Baltimore’s top prosecutor in contempt of court, finding she violated a gag order with a social media comment about a high-profile murder case. The Daily Record reports the judge fined State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby $1,500, but ruled she can avoid paying the fine by following a more restrictive gag order in coming months. Prosecutors have unsuccessfully tried Keith Davis Jr. for murder four times in the 2015 shooting death of a race track security guard. Mosby lost the Democratic primary to defense attorney Ivan Bates, who has said he believes the charges should be dismissed. Baltimore is heavily Democratic, and no Republican has filed to run in November.

Police in Florida say they will investigate a lawmaker’s allegation that a transgender student may have sexually assaulted a female student in a middle school bathroom over the summer. But school officials in Brevard County say no such attack took place and investigators say they received no reports about the rumor. Melbourne police assigned two detectives to investigate the allegations after reading Republican State Rep. Randy Fine’s social media posts about the alleged attack. Fine says parents told him that they learned about the incident from a teacher who is afraid to go public with the information. Russell Bruhn disputed Fine’s allegations, saying, “No attack took place."

A Democratic candidate for the Oregon House of Representatives is suing the owner of a massage parlor in Woodburn, Oregon, after he says she tried to initiate sexual contact with him. Oregon Public Broadcasting reports that in a suit filed in Marion County Circuit Court Thursday, Anthony Medina claims the owner of Woodburn Spa caused him “emotional injury and mental anguish, trauma, an inability to form close relationships, nightmares” and other negative effects in the incident. Medina is requesting damages of $450,000. He’s also asking a court to block the owner from operating parlors in Woodburn, Portland and Eugene that were registered with the state under her name. Medina, the chair of the Woodburn School Board, is currently the Democratic nominee for House District 22.

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Social media users shared a range of false claims this week. Here are the facts: An image purporting to show Ghislaine Maxwell with the judge who approved the FBI search warrant for Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate was manipulated by combining two unrelated photos. Monkeypox hasn't been detected in Georgia drinking water. A video of a speech by Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta was translated incorrectly to English. The World Health Organization Director-General is vaccinated against COVID-19, and scientists say a recent finding that Earth is spinning slightly faster is no cause for concern.

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The head of Kenya's electoral commission says vote-tallying in the country's close presidential election isn’t moving fast enough. Meanwhile, parallel counting by local media dramatically slowed amid public concerns about censorship or meddling. With no clear winner emerging and perhaps days more to wait, social media is busy with unverified claims by both candidates’ supporters. Human rights groups call that dangerous in a country with a history of political violence. Kenya could see a runoff presidential election for the first time. One electoral expert says there shouldn't be a problem finishing the count by the constitutional deadline of seven days after Tuesday’s vote.

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Since its independence in 1947, India has transformed from a poverty-stricken nation into one of the world's fastest-growing economies. Over the years it also became a democratic counterweight to its authoritarian neighbor, China, and made strong gains in electoral participation and peaceful transitions of power. But as India, the world’s largest democracy, celebrates 75 years of independence on Monday, its independent judiciary, diverse media and minorities are buckling under the strain, putting its democracy under pressure. Experts and critics partly blame Prime Minister Narendra Modi's populist government for this backsliding, accusing him of using unbridled political power to undermine democratic freedoms and preoccupying itself with pursuing a Hindu nationalist agenda.

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An eastern Indiana police chief says an officer shot in the head during a traffic stop and search for possible narcotics remains in “extremely critical” condition. Richmond Police Department Officer Seara Burton is being treated at a hospital in Dayton, Ohio, following the shooting Wednesday evening. Richmond Police Chief Michael Britt said in a Facebook post Thursday night that “surgery has been performed and she is initially showing slight signs of responsiveness." However, he says Burton "has not regained consciousness and is still fighting for her life.” Burton responded to a call about 6:30 p.m. Wednesday from other officers to assist with the stop.

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Donald Trump has hired a prominent Atlanta criminal defense attorney known for defending famous rappers to represent him in matters related to the special grand jury that’s investigating whether the former president illegally tried to interfere with the 2020 election in Georgia. Drew Findling’s clients have included Cardi B, Migos and Gucci Mane, as well as comedian Katt Williams. His firm said in a statement Thursday that it is representing the former president along with two other attorneys. The statement says no violations of Georgia law have been committed and calls the investigation "misdirected and politically driven."

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Florida prosecutors have announced a second-degree murder charge against social media model Courtney Clenney in the fatal stabbing last April of her live-in boyfriend. Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Fernandez Rundle announced the charge Thursday against Clenney, a 26-year-old model who goes by the name Courtney Tailor on online platforms. She was arrested Wednesday in Hawaii and authorities are seeking her extradition to Florida. Prosecutors have characterized Christian Obumseli’s death at the couple’s Miami apartment as the culmination of a “tempestuous” relationship that began in 2020. According to an arrest report, Clenney acknowledged killing her boyfriend but said she acted in self defense.

California lawmakers have rejected a proposal that could have forced some social media companies to pay fines for using features they know can harm children. The bill would have let the attorney general or local prosecutors sue social media companies for damages of up to $250,000 per violation. Supporters said the legislation was needed to protect children. But California's influential tech industry said the bill would have done little to protect child safety. It was one of hundreds that failed to pass a key legislative committee on Thursday without any comment. Lawmakers have until the end of the month to pass bills.

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Political leaders honored Republican U.S. Rep. Jackie Walorski of Indiana as a determined advocate for her beliefs during a funeral after she and three other people were killed in a highway crash last week. Numerous members of Congress were among several hundred mourners Thursday at a church near Walorski’s northern Indiana home. Republican House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Walorski never had a job, but “a mission," pointing to her work as a Christian missionary in Romania with her husband, as the director of a local humane society and as a television news reporter before entering politics. Walorski was first elected to Congress in 2012 and was seeking reelection this year in the solidly Republican district.

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Whether it's the fitness tracker on your wrist, the “smart” home appliances in your house or the latest kids’ fad going viral in online videos, they all produce a trove of personal data for big tech companies. How that data is being used and protected has led to growing public concern and officials’ outrage. Now federal regulators are looking at drafting rules to crack down on what they call harmful commercial surveillance and lax data security. The Federal Trade Commission announced the initiative Thursday, seeking public comment on the harmful effects of companies’ data collection and the potential benefit of new rules to protect consumers’ privacy.

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An off-duty Virginia police officer who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, with a fellow officer has been sentenced to more than seven years in prison. That matches the longest prison sentence so far among hundreds of Capitol riot cases. Former Rocky Mount Police Sgt. Thomas Robertson didn’t speak in court Thursday before U.S. District Judge Christopher Cooper sentenced him to seven years and three months in prison. Cooper also sentenced Robertson to three years of supervised release after his prison term. Robertson gets credit for the 13 months he has already been jailed. Federal prosecutors had recommended an eight-year prison sentence.

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