Stewart Brandborg, who fueled the national campaign to pass the Wilderness Act of 1964, died at his home outside of Hamilton on Sunday at age 93.

“Brandy was a passionate and tireless advocate for protecting America’s wilderness,” Wilderness Society President Jamie Williams said in an email on Sunday. “His ability to mentor advocates and galvanize citizen action was unmatched. He took up the leadership of The Wilderness Society right after the untimely death of Howard Zahniser, the author of the Wilderness Act, and Brandborg led the organization through a critical time for America’s conservation movement.

"His talents and passions, which never ebbed, have contributed greatly to conservation and preservation of America’s wilderness.”

Brandborg worked as a special assistant to Zahniser while the Wilderness Act was working its way through Congress in the early 1960s. He traveled the nation encouraging local environmental and conservation groups to support the act, which was passed in 1964.

After that, he resumed the circuit to rally interest in new recommendations for future wilderness areas. He served as The Wilderness Society executive director during a period when Congress approved more than 70 federal wilderness areas in 31 states.

This story will be updated.

2
2
0
3
0