A Stevensville teen who allegedly called the man charged in the recent Florida shooting a hero was charged with felony intimidation in Ravalli County District Court Wednesday.

While watching footage of the shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Feb. 14, the 17-year-old reportedly told other Stevensville High School students that he planned to “shoot up the school," according to charging documents filed Thursday.

The teen was arrested Friday, Feb. 23, after students alerted school administrators about the student’s alleged threats that continued for more than a week after the Florida shooting.

Charging documents said the juvenile told classmates the Florida shooter “had done it wrong” and explained in detail, in a series of conversations, what he would do differently.

One student told officials the juvenile told him that if he didn’t pass his English class, he would come to school with an AR-15 and kill his teacher and other students. The student said he didn’t report the conversation initially because he didn’t think the juvenile was serious, charging documents said.

The student said he became alarmed when the juvenile’s comments “went from humor to a plan.”

The juvenile allegedly told a friend that he would tell him when the shooting would happen so he could stay away from the school.

In an interview with Stevensville Police Chief James Marble, the juvenile allegedly admitted making a statement about bringing a gun to school and shooting people, but said he wasn’t serious. The juvenile told Marble he had made the threat out of frustration of receiving a grade of zero on an English class assignment.

The juvenile’s mother told Marble the teenager did not have access to firearms at their home.

The juvenile remains in custody.

The alleged threat was one of three that occurred at Ravalli County schools following the shooting in Florida.

A Darby 18-year-old was arrested on felony charges after he told friends he planned to “shoot up the school” and posted links to the Florida shooting in which he allegedly wrote “coming soon to Darby.”

Two days later, the Darby schools received a Snapchat post that referenced the old threats and added new ones. Ravalli County sheriff’s deputies interviewed a 14-year-old from Los Angeles who allegedly sent the message. The only connection the California youth had to Montana was through online gaming with the Darby suspect.